Members

 

MEMBERS


Dr Colm Bracken
Areas of Interest

Exoplanets
Cosmology
Instrumentation
Superconductivity
Electronics

Bio

Colm studied physics with astrophysics at National University of Ireland, Maynooth, graduating in 2010 with 1st class honours. He received his PhD in 2015 from N.U.I. Maynooth for research in electromagnetic analysis and design of far-infrared receivers and detectors for the SAFARI instrument on the SPICA space telescope. Colm lectured at UCD (University College Dublin) from 2016 to 2017, coordinating undergraduate and graduate modules including Galaxies, Cosmology and the ISM; Space Mission Design; Gamma-ray Space Detectors; and Cubesat Subsystems; while continuing research in far-infrared instrumentation and simulation. From 2017 to 2020 he was a postdoctoral researcher at DIAS (Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), working with Professor Tom Ray on large-format arrays of MKIDs (Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors) for optical/near-infrared astronomy. Colm went back to Maynooth University in 2020, where he is now a lecturer in Experimental Physics, and continuing research in superconducting detectors for astronomy, optics, and quasioptics.

Links

Prof. Michael Burton
Areas of Interest

Our Galaxy
Antarctica
Education
Outreach
Planetarium

Bio

Professor Michael Burton is the Director of the Armagh Observatory and Planetarium. This brings together running the oldest continuously active observatory in the UK and Ireland with its longest operating planetarium. It is a job that embraces fundamental research, education, public outreach, history, heritage and culture within a single organisation.

I am an astronomer, with primary research expertise in the formation of stars within the molecular clouds of our Galaxy, and an educator, with 25 years university-level teaching (including Director of Teaching in Physics in a large university), combined together with an active involvement in science communication and outreach.

Links

Dr. Ray Butler
Areas of Interest

Rare or transient phenomena of public interest
Star Clusters
Ultra-Cool & Brown Dwarfs
Light Pollution vs Dark Skies
Telescopes 
Detectors and Imaging
Asteroids
(Irish regional coordinator for Asteroid Day)

Bio

Ray Butler is a Lecturer in Physics and Astronomy at NUI Galway, since 2001. Hailing from Cork, he was awarded an Entrance Scholarship to University College Cork (BE [Elec] hons, 1992), and then moved into astronomical research in NUI Galway (PhD [Physics], 1999), followed by two Marie Curie postdoctoral fellowships, at the University of Edinburgh and NUI Galway respectively. He has supervised several MSc and PhD students, and frequently observes with international optical and infrared telescopes. He applies astronomical imaging technologies to the study of globular star clusters, and variable stars including optical pulsars, ultra-cool and brown dwarfs – for which he developed the GUFI high-speed photometer, stationed on the VATT telescope in Arizona. Seeking darker skies for his hobby of deep-sky astrophotography instigated his research into night sky quality. As a former Secretary-Treasurer of the ASGI, he organized the first two Irish National Astronomy Meetings.

Links

Luis Alberto Canizares
Areas of Interest

Solar Physics
General astronomy
Life in the universe
Exoplanets

Bio

Alberto is a PhD student at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies and Trinity College Dublin working in Solar Phyiscs under the supervision of Prof. Peter Gallagher and Dr. Eoin Carley. His research involves using data from Parker Solar Probe, LOFAR and Solar Orbiter to study type III radio bursts.
Alberto obtained Bachelor Degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Astrophysics from Trinity College Dublin and Dublin City University respectively and also obtained a Masters Degree at Imperial College London. For a brief period of time, Alberto worked for the mechanical engineering department of Astrium (Airbus Defence and Space) building telecommunication satellites.
Alberto has obtained awards from the Irish Research Council in order to pursue his postgraduate studies, the Naughton Foundation for doing an REU program at the University of Notre Dame publishing his first research note as a result and the Dyson Award in Ireland. 

Links

Dr. Alessio Caratti o Garatti
Areas of Interest

Star and planet formation
Interstellar medium
Stellar evolution
European Southern Observatory (ESO)
Space science

Bio

Alessio Caratti o Garatti is a researcher at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies and adjunct associate professor at University College Dublin. He is an observational astrophysicist working in star formation, in particular accretion and ejection processes in young stellar objects and their protoplanetary disks. He is involved in the science of the Mid-InfraRed-Instrument (MIRI) on board of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST).

Links

Dr. Eoin Carley
Areas of Interest
Solar physics
Radio astronomy
Shockwaves
Shock particle acceleration
Plasma physics
Machine Learning
Bio

Dr Eoin Carley attained his PhD at Trinity College Dublin in 2014, with a primary research focus on eruptions, shockwaves, and particle acceleration in the solar atmosphere. In the same year he was awarded a prestigious Irish Research Council ELEVATE fellowship, co-funded by Marie-Curie Actions, allowing him to take up a postdoctoral position at the Laboratoire d’Études Spatiales et d’Instrumentation en Astrophysique (LESIA) at the Paris Observatory from 2014 – 2016. While at LESIA he worked on the radio signatures of particle acceleration in the solar atmosphere using the Nançay Radioheliograph and Nançay Decametric Array, located in central France. In 2019, Eoin was awarded the Schrödinger Fellowship to undertake 5 years of research in the Astronomy & Astrophysics Section of the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. The current focus of his research is in using the Irish Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) and the International LOFAR telescope to observe eruptions, shockwaves and intense bursts of plasma emission in the solar atmosphere.

Links


Dr. Masha Chernyakova
Areas of Interest

High Energy Astrophysics
Multi-wavelength Astronomy
Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA)
Gamma-ray Binaries
Galactic Centre

Bio

Masha Chernyakova got her  Bachelor and Master degrees at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technique and was awarded a Ph.D. in Physics from Lebedev Physical Institute in Moscow. After postdoctoral work at Integral Science Data Center, Switzerland and at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, she took up an academic position in the School of Physical Sciences at Dublin City University. She currently holds the position of Associate Professor and is a chair of the physics with astronomy (PHA) Programme Board. Her main scientific interests lie in the area of high energy astrophysics.  In her work she combines a theoretical approach of the modelling of sources with the analysis of experimental data. During her career she has organized a number of multiwavelength observational campaigns, including radio, optical, X-ray and VHE. She is an Irish representative at Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) consortium and is actively working on CTA development.

Links


Dr. Deirdre Coffey
Areas of Interest

Star Formation
Planet Formation
Exoplanets

Bio

Dr Deirdre Coffey is an Assistant Professor of Astrophysics and Space Science at the UCD School of Physics. She studies the formation of stars and planets, via high angular resolution observations.

Links


Prof. Peter Coles
Areas of Interest

Cosmology
Large-scale structure of the Universe
Galaxy clustering
Cosmic Microwave Background
Open Access Publishing

Bio

I am a theoretical astrophysicist and Head of the Department of Theoretical Physics at Maynooth University.  My research is in the area of cosmology and the large-scale structure of the Universe, specifically on theoretical models that try to account for the properties of the observable universe, including the cosmic microwave background and galaxy clustering. I also research cosmological models that feature magnetic fields, Non-Gaussianity and asymmetries, as well as models based on theories of gravity other than Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity.

Links

Dr. Oisín Creaner
Areas of Interest

Big Data
Exoplanets
Radio Astronomy
Dark Matter

Bio

Oisín Creaner is a graduate of Trinity College Dublin and Technological University Dublin who now works as a NESAP postdoctoral research fellow at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California, USA.  His specialisation is in the application of High-Performance Computing techniques to the analysis of large astronomical and cosmological datasets.  His current research concentrates on improving the computational performance of the LUX ZEPLIN Dark Matter detector.

Links

Prof.Turlough Downes
Areas of Interest

Star Formation

Planet Formation

Bio

Turlough Downes is a Professor of mathematics and astrophysics at DCU.  His research is primarily focused on understanding how stars and planets form, and how astrophysical plasma turbulence can affect these processes.  He is an expert in computational astrophysics and the associated high performance computing. He is founding Director of the Centre for Astrophysics & Relativity at DCU, and former Director of SCI-SYM, the computational science research centre at DCU.  He was also founding Chair of the PRACE User Forum (PRACE is the EU Research Infrastructure for high performance computing).

Links

Prof. Alan Fitzsimmons
Areas of Interest

Comets
Asteroids
Near-Earth Objects
Asteroid impacts
Interstellar Objects

Bio

Alan Fitzsimmons is a Professor of Astronomy in the Astrophysics Research Centre at Queen’s University Belfast, UK. He mostly studies comets and asteroids orbiting our Sun, using telescopes including the Very Large Telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope.  He has published over 140 scientific papers, and talked about his work in print, on radio and television. Highlights of his career include explaining effects on Jupiter caused by the collision of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 in 1994, observing asteroid 2008 TC3 before its collision with Earth, and studying the first known Interstellar Objects.  Currently he is an active member of the Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System (ATLAS) and the ESA Hera planetary defense mission.

Links

Dr. Morgan Fraser
Areas of Interest

Supernovae
Gravitational waves Massive stars
Multi-messenger astronomy

Bio

Morgan Fraser is a Royal Society – Science Foundation Ireland University Research Fellow at University College Dublin. His group aims to understand the ultimate fate of the most massive stars as core-collapse supernovae, and find new classes of extragalactic transients. Along with this, he has a leading role in the search for the counterparts of gravitational waves through the ENGRAVE collaboration.

Links

Dr. Rebeca Garcia Lopez
Areas of Interest

Star formation
Planet formation
ESO

Bio

Rebeca Garcia Lopez is a Science Foundation Ireland research fellow at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies (moving to UCD from January 2020). She studies the formation of stars and planets using high angular resolution observations.

Links

Prof. Peter Gallagher 
Areas of Interest

Solar Physics,
Space Weather,
Ground & space-based instrumentation

Bio

I am Head of Astrophysics at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies and an Adjunct Professor at Trinity College Dublin. My reseach is primarly concerned with understanding the fundamental physics of solar storms and their impacts on Earth. I have a long association with ESA and NASA and lead the Irish LOFAR radio telescope project.
I received a BSc (HONS) in physics and mathematics from University College Dublin in 1995, followed by an MSc (Distinction) in optoelectronics and image processing and a PhD in solar physics from Queen’s University Belfast. I then spent six great years in the US, firstly as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Owens Valley Solar Array and Big Bear Solar Observatory in California and then as a Scientist and Senior Scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Before joining DIAS in 2018, I spent 13 years running a Solar Physics & Space Weather Research Group at Trinity College Dublin.

I was particularly happy to have served on ESA’s Solar System Working Group, which was responsible for ESA space science mission evaluation for 2015-2025, and most recently on ESA’s Space Science Advisory Committee (2017-2019).

Links

Prof. Neal Gibson
Areas of Interest

Exoplanets,
Exoplanet Atmospheres,
Observational astronomy,
Statistics & Machine Learning

Bio

Prof. Neale Gibson is an astrophysicist at Trinity College Dublin, and a Royal Society/Science Foundation Ireland University Research Fellow. His research focuses on the discovery and characterisation of extra-solar planets, i.e. planets that orbit stars other than our Sun, in particular focussing on observational and statistical methods for studying exoplanet atmospheres. He was previously a research fellow and fellow support astronomer at the European Southern Observatory, and before that a postdoctoral research assistant at the University of Oxford. Prior to that he did his undergraduate degree and PhD at Queen’s University Belfast.

Links

Dr. Aaron Golden
Areas of Interest

Magnetospheres/Aurora (substellar, stellar and post-stellar)
Brown Dwarfs & Ultracool substellar objects
Pulsars and pulsar nebula
High speed radio and optical astronomy
Astronomical Data Sciences

Bio

I’m a Lecturer in the School of Maths, NUI Galway, a member of the University’s Centre for Astronomy, and Visiting Associate at the Armagh Observatory and Planetarium. I trained as a physicist (B.A. from Trinity College Dublin, M.Sc. from Queens University Belfast) and completed a Ph.D. in Astrophysics in 1999 on pulsars at NUI Galway. I have always been very much an interdisciplinary researcher, working in areas as diverse from genomics to earth observation science, but nearly all of my work is inspired by my on-going astronomical research, which is really what I love to do best. I started using radio telescopes almost as soon as I finished my Ph.D., and came back home to Ireland just in time to use our very own national radio telescope facility, I-LOFAR located on the grounds of Birr Castle in County Offaly.

Links

Prof. Jose Groh
Areas of Interest

Stars

Supernovae

Black holes

Bio

Prof Jose Groh is an astrophysicist at Trinity College Dublin. His scientific interests concern the physical processes responsible for how stars evolve, die, and affect the Universe. His group produces leading research in the field of stellar evolution and explosions, with unique expertise in both theoretical and observational aspects of stars, atmospheres, supernovae, black holes, and the first stars in the Universe. For addressing these scientific topics, my group develops unique numerical stellar evolution and radiative transfer models, in addition to leading and being involved in observational efforts to investigate stars and supernovae using major telescopes.

Links

Prof. Lorraine Hanlon
Areas of Interest

Watcher Telescope
EIRSAT-1

Bio

LORRAINE HANLON is Full Professor of Astronomy in the School of Physics at University College Dublin (UCD) and Director of UCD’s interdisciplinary Centre for Space Research (C-SPACE). She did her undergraduate and graduate degrees in Experimental Physics and was a research fellow at the European Space and Technology Research Centre in the Netherlands. Her main research interests are gamma-ray bursts, multi-messenger astronomy, robotic telescopes, and space instrumentation.  

Lorraine is Chair of ESA’s Astronomy Working Group, a trustee of the Royal Astronomical Society, and programme director of UCD’s MSc in Space Science and Technology. She is the Endorsing Professor for EIRSAT-1, Ireland’s first satellite, a CubeSat being developed through ESA’s ‘Fly Your Satellite!’ programme, and is Principal Investigator of the Watcher robotic telescope in South Africa.

Links

Dr. Caitriona Jackman
Areas of Interest

Solar system
Planets
Space Weather
Magnetospheres

Bio

Dr. Jackman is a Science Foundation Ireland Principal Research Fellow and Honorary Professor of Space Physics at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. At the heart of her research is Space Plasma Physics in our solar system and beyond. She is an expert in planetary magnetospheres, the magnetic bubbles which surround magnetised planets. She has worked with data from missions including NASA’s Cassini at Saturn, ESA’s Cluster mission in orbit around Earth, NASA’s Juno at Jupiter, and with data from the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Her research interests include understanding how the aurora works, and how machine learning and complexity science can be used to study huge volumes of data from space.

Links

Prof. C. Simon Jeffery
Areas of Interest

Pulsating Stars
Evolved Stars (including hot subdwarfs and extreme helium stars)
Stellar Atmospheres
Stellar Physics
Double White Dwarf Mergers

Bio

Born in Newcastle and raised in Edinburgh, Simon studied Physics at Imperial College, London, and Astrophysics at St Andrews, Scotland. After postdoc fellowships in St Andrews and Kiel, Germany, he was appointed to a research astronomer position at the Armagh Observatory and Planetarium in1996.  He is also adjunct Professor of Physics at Trinity College Dublin. Simon has held a lifelong interest in how stars work and how they vary over time. His PhD in the theory of stellar structure and evolution was followed by observational and theoretical work on stellar pulsations and atmospheres. Most stars retain a hydrogen surface to the very end. However, in rare and extreme cases, some stars become true ‘helium’ stars with surfaces partly or completely depleted in hydrogen. Simon’s goal is to explore the physics of their outer layers and to demonstrate their elusive origins. A surprising conclusion is that the majority appear to have formed from the merger of two very old and faint stars … a double white dwarf. His favourite is V652 Herculis — the pulsating ‘born-again rocket star’.

Links

Dr. Patrick Kavanagh
Areas of Interest

X-ray astronomy
Supernova remnants, superbubbles, hot interstellar medium
James Webb Space Telescope

Bio

Dr. Kavanagh is a software developer and postdoctoral researcher at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. He studied in both Dublin Institute of Technology and Dublin City University. He worked for several years at the Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics Tübingen in Germany on high-energy studies of supernova remnants, superbubbles, and the hot interstellar medium. He returned to Dublin in 2016 and now works on the calibration/software team for the Mid-Infrared Instrument on the James Webb Space Telescope, as well as continuing his research.

Links

Dr. Peter Keys
Areas of Interest

Solar Physics

Ground-based solar observations

Small-scale magnetic fields on the Sun

Bio

Peter Keys is a lecturer at Queen’s University Belfast. His research is in the field of solar physics and he specialises in ground-based observations of small-scale magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere. His work aims to understand the evolution of magnetic fields over time and how these small-scale features transfer energy between regions in the solar atmosphere.

Links

Dr. Jonathan Mackey
Areas of Interest

Massive Stars
Supernovae
Simulation
High-Energy Astrophysics
Meteors

Bio

Jonathan Mackey leads a research group investigating Massive Stars and High-Energy Astrophysics at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies.  He uses computer simulations in comparison with observations, to gain understanding of massive stars, their nebulae, and supernova remnants.  He develops and maintains a computational fluid dynamics code, PION, and is a member of the H.E.S.S. collaboration.  He is actively involved in education and public engagements projects at DIAS Dunsink Observatory.

Links

Samuel Mckeague
Areas of Interest

High Energy Astrophysics
X-ray binaries
gamma-ray binaries
Athena Telescope
CTA
Cosmology

Bio

BSc in Physics with Astronomy from Dublin City University (graduated 2017, received the Fryar’s medal for my final year research project)
Current Research: Modelling and simulating high energy emission from High Mass X-ray Binaries including Fermi analysis of gamma-ray binaries, observation simulations of eclipsing binary Vela X-1 for the Athena XIFU and simulation of transient sources such as SS433 with the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA).

Links

Pearse Murphy
Areas of Interest

Solar Physics
Space Weather
Solar Radio Bursts

Bio

I am a PhD student in Trinity College Dublin and the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies (DIAS) under the co-supervision of Prof. Peter Gallagher and Dr. Eoin Carley. My research focuses on interferometric radio imaging of solar bursts using the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR).
I am also involved in the development of the REALtime Transient Acquisition (REALTA) cluster for recording and processing data from the Irish LOFAR station I-LOFAR in Birr, Co. Offaly. I am one of I-LOFAR’s Chief Observers and regularly monitor the sun for radio signatures of solar activity.

Links

Dr. Sophie Murray
Areas of Interest

space weather

solar physics

science communication

Bio

Sophie is a Research Fellow at Trinity College Dublin and Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. She is a space weather scientist, studying solar eruptions from the Sun and how they impact the Earth. Sophie is also involved in public engagement and outreach at Dunsink Observatory, as well as leading the Astronomical Midlands project to engage rural communities with astronomy.

Links

Dr. Créidhe O’Sullivan
Areas of Interest

Cosmic microwave background

Astronomical instrumentation

Bio

Créidhe O’Sullivan is Senior lecturer in the Department of Experimental Physics, National University of Ireland Maynooth where she carries out research on astronomical instrumentaton operating at far-infrared wavelengths, and in particular on telescopes designed to image very faint temperature and polarisation features in the cosmic microwave background radiation (e.g. a current ground-based project QUBIC).  She has a degree in Experimental Physics from University College Dublin and a PhD in Physics from Cambridge University.

Links

Dr. Simon Purser
Areas of Interest

Ionised Jets
Radio astronomy
Star formation
Giant Molecular Clouds

Bio

Using radio observations of young stellar objects (YSOs), I examine the properties of ionised, collimated ejection-phenomena (jets) launched (with speeds of several 100s of km/s) as by-products of the star formation process. These jets are intrinsically tied to accretion (accumulation of matter by forming stars) and as such are an indirect method of studying the star formation paradigm. Both low (< 8 solar masses) and high mass YSOs are included in my research and a key question I am looking to answer is if both mass regimes form in similar ways. Currently I am part of the Ejection Accretion Structures around YSOs (EASY) project at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies and will be using the highest resolution radio observations possible to examine the physical processes of launching/collimation near the launching point of the jets.

Links

Associate Prof. John Quinn
Areas of Interest
High-Energy Astrophysics 
Active Galaxies and Blazars
Gamma-ray Astronomy
Radio Astronomy
Bio
John Quinn is an Associate Professor in the School of Physics at University College Dublin.
He is a member of and current spokesperson for the VERITAS Collaboration, an international
consortium which operates an array of four 12m imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes
for TeV gamma-ray astronomy in Arizona. He is also a member of the Irish LOFAR consortium
and participates in the LOFAR Surveys Science Working Group. His research is primarily in
the area of high-energy astrophysics including the study of relativistic jets from active galaxies.
 
 
 
 
Links

Prof. Tom Ray
Areas of Interest

Star and Planet Formation
High Energy Astrophysics
European Southern Observatory
LOFAR
Ancient Astronomical Sites
(Archaeo-astronomy)

Bio

Tom Ray is Professor of Astrophysics at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. He began his career in Radio Astronomy at Jodrell Bank before working at the University of Sussex and the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg. His main area of interest is star and planet formation and, in particular, the supersonic jets that stars like our sun produce when less than a million years old. Tom is  Co-Principal Investigator of the Mid-Infrared Instrument on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). JWST, which is due for launch in 2021, will be the largest telescope ever placed in space. He is Co-Principal Investigator on ARIEL, a mission selected by ESA, to explore exoplanet atmospheres and also leads a group developing Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) for use in Astronomy. He is an ERC Advanced Grant Laureate and his other interests include ancient astronomical sites, like Newgrange, and Historical Astronomy.

Links

Dr. Matt Redman
Areas of Interest

Star Formation
Star Destruction Processes

Bio

Matt Redman is Director of the Centre for Astronomy NUI Galway, and leads a group with research interests in star formation and star destruction processes. He uses radio and millimetre telescope data to investigate the collapse of star forming molecular clouds, and optical and millimetre data for studying the shaping mechanisms of planetary nebulae, novae and supernova remnants. He works at the observational and theory interface, simulating data from telescopes using radiative transfer, photoionisation and spatiokinematic codes. 

Links

Dr. John Regan
Areas of Interest

Black Holes
Cosmology
First Stars
Quasars
CMB

Bio

John Regan is a theoretical astrophysicist focusing on the formation of black holes in the early Universe. I use computer models to simulate the formation of structure in our universe attempting to understand what drives the formation of massive black holes in our universe.

Links

Dr. Andreas Sander
Areas of Interest

PoWR
Massive Stars
Evolved Stars
High Mass X-ray Binaries
Stellar Atmospheres
Stellar Winds and Feedback
Spectroscopy
Gravitational Waves

Bio

I am a post-doctoral researcher and appointed Öpik Fellow at Armagh Observatory and Planetarium (AOP) with scientific expertise in stellar atmospheres, in particular for hot and massive stars. During my PhD at the University of Potsdam in Germany, I discovered my passion for Wolf-Rayet and other evolved stars.

I am an active developer of PoWR, a leading code in simulating the complex atmospheres of hot stars with radiatively driven winds. Located at the conjunction of theory and observations, I use my atmosphere models to quantify the physical properties of massive stars and their winds. This includes the analysis of observations from modern, large-scale telescopes as well as providing predictions for mass-loss rates, stellar spectra and feedback, crucial ingredients to better understand stellar populations and the origin of massive black holes and gravitational waves.

Links

Dr Stephen Scully
Areas of Interest

THz
Quasi-optics
CMB
E-modes
B-modes
Gaussian Beam Modes
Cosmology

Bio

Dr Scully graduated with a BSc. in Electrical/Electronic Engineering from Trinity University in 1996. Over a 15-year career Dr Scully completed numerous projects in highly regulated pharmaceutical and medical device industries before returning to University in 2010. He completed a Higher Diploma in Physics in 2011 and on the back of his results was awarded 2 scholarships, the John Hume Scholarship and a Doctoral Teaching Fellowship. Accepting the latter, he completed a Ph.D. in Quasi-Optical Design and Analysis of a Bolometric Interferometer for CMB Experiments at Maynooth University in 2015. He continued working as a post-doctoral researcher and in 2017 was offered a lectureship at the Institute of Technology Carlow. He is currently employed as a Lecturer in the department of Aerospace, Mechanical and Electronics Engineering within the School of Engineering at IT Carlow. He is a member of the IT Carlow Engineering Centre of Research and Enterprise (engCORE).

Links

Dr. Neil Trappe
Areas of Interest

Telescopes & receivers
Radio astronomy
Cosmology

Bio

Neil Trappe works in the Experimental Physics Department at Maynooth University. His research interests are in the field of far-infrared space instrumentation. He has worked on the HIFI instrument for the European Space Agency’s Herschel Space Observatory (ESA PRODEX funded), Band 5 & 9 optical design for ALMA (SFI Research Frontiers funded) and currently is working on and managing a number of Technical Research Projects for the European Space Agency. This work is developing efficient analysis techniques, instrument design, and focal plane pixel architectures for future Cosmic Microwave Background space missions. He also recently obtained an SFI Infrastructure Award to establish a THz frequency measurement system.

Links

Prof Aline Vidotto
Areas of Interest

Star-planet interactions
Numerical simulations
Stellar winds
Exoplanets

Bio

Aline Vidotto is an academic at Trinity College Dublin. She studies the interaction of exoplanets with their host star’s wind, and how this interaction can affect exoplanets (for example, generating auroral emission, inducing atmospheric evaporation and possible links to planetary habitability). For that, she develops 3D simulations of winds of Sun-like stars, that permeate entire exoplanetary systems. Her realistic account of stellar winds has supplied more detailed diagnostics of the wind interaction with exoplanets, guiding observers towards the most promising systems to host detectable signatures of such interactions.

Links

Dr. Emma Whelan
Areas of Interest

Star formation
Planet formation
Exoplanets
Telescopes
Observational astronomy
Spectroscopy
Women in Physics

Bio

Emma Whelan is a lecturer in the Department of Experimental Physics Maynooth University and her field of study is star and planet formation. She graduated from Trinity College Dublin in 2001 with a BA in Physics with Astrophysics. From 2001 to 2005 she studied at the Dublin Institute for Advanced studies for a PhD in observational astronomy and graduated with a PhD in 2005. She continued her work in this area at the Dublin Institute of Advanced Studies as part of the Marie Curie Research and Training Network JETSET from 2005 to 2009. In 2009 she was awarded a Marie Curie Fellowship at the Institut de Planétologie et d’Astrophysique de Grenoble and studied there until 2011. In 2012 she moved to the Institut für Astronomie und Astrophysik Tübingen. In 2016 she was appointed as a lecturer in the Experimental Physics Department

Links

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